Denver Post
January 25, 2016

DENVER, CO - DECEMBER 14: Brake lights fill Interstate-25 as traffic passes after 6 p.m., near Alameda. Denver traffic along I-25 was photographed on Monday, December 14, 2015. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post)

DENVER, CO – DECEMBER 14: Brake lights fill Interstate-25 as traffic passes after 6 p.m., near Alameda. Denver traffic along I-25 was photographed on Monday, December 14, 2015. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post)

Traffic in Denver. Potholes in Colorado Springs. Unplowed roads on the Eastern Plains. Highway closures in the mountains. Gridlock on Interstate 25 north.

The state’s transportation problems all collide in one place: the Capitol. And the impact is pushing the perennial issue of state transportation funding to the top of the 2016 legislative to-do list.

Gov. John Hickenlooper and lawmakers are mostly united this session in a mission to find more money for road building and maintenance, but what is less universal is the solution.

Democrats and Republicans are moving in opposite directions and struggling to reach consensus on how to find more money — an impasse that is complicated by a state budget crunch.

Half of Colorado’s $1.28 billion transportation budget is spent on maintaining existing roads, according to state officials, which leaves little room for expansion projects demanded by a booming population. Colorado Department of Transportation officials estimate that revenues fall short of demand by about $1 billion a year. Read on…

Summit Daily News
December 28, 2015

The Colorado Department of Transportation opened the new I-70 Express Lane to tolling on Saturday, Dec. 19. Over the past two weekends, tolls have remained near the base rate, set at $3.

The Colorado Department of Transportation opened the new I-70 Express Lane to tolling on Saturday, Dec. 19. Over the past two weekends, tolls have remained near the base rate, set at $3.

Two weeks after its official opening, Colorado Department of Transportation officials see the Interstate 70 Express Lane as a success. The 13-mile toll lane, stretching eastbound between Empire and Idaho Springs, began collecting tolls the weekend of Dec. 19 and opened again Dec. 26 and 27.

“It went really, really well,” CDOT communications director Amy Ford said. “It kept traffic moving and sort of helped with the delay.”

While the toll range was set for $3 to $30, with prices increasing with traffic volume, she said the toll rested at about $3 through the weekend. Read on…

Financing and Accelerating the Next Generation of Major Transportation Projects in Colorado By SS-Baumgardnerenator Randy Baumgardner/Rep Brian DelGrosso

Upon referral and voter approval in 2015, Colorado can generate $3.5 Billion in funding by renewing the successful 1999 TRANS Bonding Program. With interest rates at their lowest in history, the state can bond against 50% of federal gas tax dollars to generate the approximately $3.5 Billion in bond proceeds … a lump sum which will used to accelerate defined, and much needed, transportation projects throughout Colorado. In addition to over 30 important projects located in every region of the state, signature projects for TRANS II would be congestion mitigation of the I-70 Mountain Corridor and the North I-25 Corridor.

H-DelGrossoAs was the case in 1999, CDOT has already identified $2.93 billion in transportation projects that meet the following criteria: 1) the project or corridor is strategic in nature 2) it does not have significant construction funding already identified 3) must be able to begin construction within 5 years and 4) must be economically significant for the state and/or region in which it resides.

 

TRANS II – Get Colorado Moving!

CDOT Response to Transportation Partners

Potential Project Listing

An Insider’s Perspective – Outlook for Transportation in 2014

Co-sponsored by Move Colorado and the Ports-to-Plains Alliance, join us for a compelling webinar on Friday, March 7 from 10-11 a.m. MST with nationally recognized public policy expert Jack Schenendorf, as he shares insights on how policymakers in Washington D.C. are approaching transportation funding.

You will leave the webinar with:

  • An understanding of current transportation funding issues,
  • A broader understanding of how we arrived at this point,
  • A projection of how the federal government is likely to approach future transportation funding for states, and
  • A candid examination of options we have to address these issues for Colorado.

Perhaps most valuable of all, you will have fresh understanding of current transportation funding challenges in Colorado!

For more information, view our event news release. Space is limited, so register now!

Also, be sure to download the Transportation Funding Webinar Primer as event prep!