“We’ve gained 800,000 people in the last decade and yet … we’re spending less now than we spent in 2007. If you have growth and a funding problem — you have trouble,” Hickenlooper said, adding that CDOT has $9 billion worth of needed projects, but doesn’t have the money to pay for them.

Colorado needs to invest more money in its transportation infrastructure — or risk the state’s growing economy choking on traffic congestion, Gov. John Hickenlooper said Monday.

Hickenlooper spoke at the 2017 Colorado Transportation Matters Summit, organized by the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and the Transit Alliance.

The summit, which drew 1,000 people from the state’s agencies and businesses that work on highways and transit networks, was held at the Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center.

Colorado has invested in the state’s infrastructure and education in the past, and seen it pay off in the form of a booming economy and low unemployment, Hickenlooper told the luncheon crowd.

But “transportation has been a prickly problem” for the state and one marked by a divide between urban and rural legislators, he said.

But the basic facts remain the same: Colorado’s roads and highways are aging and the state’s gasoline tax, 22 cents per gallon, hasn’t been raised since 1992.

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