Two articles from USA Today addressing the discussions around the nation about the need to have adequate revenue to maintain and expand the transportation infrastructure.

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“Funding transportation has reached a point of national crisis, says the American Society of Engineers, which estimates the country needs to spend $2.7 trillion on total infrastructure between now and 2020, but is falling more than $1 trillion short of that.”

Link to the Report from the American Society of Engineers

Click here for complete article > USA Today

January 25, 2013

States are scrambling to find taxes to pay for highway repairs and their public transit systems, including payroll and sales taxes, and raising taxes paid by gasoline stations.

The proposals, being kicked around in at least 13 states as governors lay out their legislative agendas for the year, come as states find revenue from stagnant federal and state gasoline taxes isn’t keeping up with highways, bridges and urban transit systems that increasingly are falling into disrepair…

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Time to tweak gas taxes? States weigh options

The debate now is over whether the gas tax can be made sustainable with some fixes, whether other forms of taxation will pay for roads, or whether fees — such as highway tolls and per-mile-traveled charges — can fund transportation networks.

Click here for complete article > USA Today

January 25, 2013

A great tax debate is breaking out in state capitals from Vermont to Texas: How do we maintain and expand our vital-but-aging networks of roads, bridges and urban transit systems?

For nearly a century, the nation has funded projects primarily with revenue from gasoline taxes. But the gasoline tax has lost its value over the past decade. Changes in fuel-saving automotive technology and driving habits are resulting in less revenue to repair crumbling bridges, repave highways or upgrade buses and trains…