U.S. Chamber of Commerce
June 22, 2015

Joe Van Dieren pumps diesel gasoline, priced at $2.51.9, into his truck Monday morning, March 21, 2005 at Bob's 76 Service station in Fullerton, California. The average U.S. retail gasoline price reached an all-time high of $2.072 a gallon on March 19, up 17 cents in a month, according to AAA, the former American Automobile Association, in Heathrow, Florida. Photographer: Susan Goldman/Bloomberg News.

Joe Van Dieren pumps diesel gasoline, priced at $2.51.9, into his truck Monday morning, March 21, 2005 at Bob’s 76 Service station in Fullerton, California. The average U.S. retail gasoline price reached an all-time high of $2.072 a gallon on March 19, up 17 cents in a month, according to AAA, the former American Automobile Association, in Heathrow, Florida. Photographer: Susan Goldman/Bloomberg News.

America’s trucking industry wants Congress to raise taxes on fuel.

No, you read that correctly. Raise, not lower.

Naturally, that begs the question: What could drive America’s truckers, who spend more than $100 billion on diesel every year, including roughly $16 billion in fuel taxes, to ask lawmakers to charge them more every time they fill up their tanks?

The answer: America’s busted roads.

During a visit last week to Capitol Hill, Bill Graves, president of the American Trucking Associations, pleaded with lawmakers to increase the federal gas tax to raise more money to repair the nation’s crumbling roads, highways and bridges as well as build new transit infrastructure. It’s urgent that they raise the tax now, he said, as the federal Highway Trust Fund – which provides capital for the majority of those types of construction projects – is currently on pace to run out of funds at the end of July. Read on…